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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
like. so i was like, let's say, killing the french fashion. i should say france in general. so absolute. it has to be like that. things that i did not feel like. i think it's time i was going, i felt really in love with london. i felt more freedom. when i was going there, it gave me -- [unintelligible] sending like, yes, go on to do the things you feel are good. because it is very conservative in paris. >> only you had come to san francisco. >> yes. >> i can only imagine what you would have produced. [applause] >> that is true. >> here is this good little boy who is be heading classically and is very charming and wonderful and working hard. how did you turn into a bad boy? [laughter] and tell us about the whole business of putting sexuality on the map, as it were. when you go into the exhibition here, it is still shocking to see some of the clothes which are suggesting a kind of pervert petit, never against women. you see a lot of flash and tattoos and in the clothing. it must've been completely taboo when you started doing the mine in 1970's and early 1980's. >> i think it was, yes. it
, but that does not mean we should repeat. tavis: the u.s. has been guilty of it as well. >> france, england, germany, the u.s., of course, even the soviet union. >> -- tavis: that is my point. everybody seems to be guilty of that over the course of history. i am glad you took a question. what does africa have today that the rest of the world does not prove >> -- does not? >> some possibilities. some structures of spirituality, and i emphasize that, spirituality which is not aggressive. decimating a culture, which christianity is guilty of. islam is guilty of. a tolerant spirituality. in the new world, in brazil, where african religions co have it and become -- where they cohabit. this is a lesson for some of the so-called world religions. they have taken joy in decimating humanity tavis: -- and decimating humanity. tavis: i raise this question. just like china, the world power now advancing in africa, the catholic church has found africa is a place that is very fertile. what say you about the catholic church all of that continent? they are getting new converts daily, hourly. >> a bit more s
-- and increased focus on the origin of the food served. the recipe for this buckwheat pancakes is from france. the organic eggs sourced locally. regionalization and globalization at the same time. the finished mulled wine index is steadily climbing. more sophisticated, source will feel right at home here. the one-euro entry price will not be much of a financial setback to anyone dining here. a one-star chef serves gourmet specialties, and the dancers are a far cry from a traditional manger scene. not to mention the products. this necklace costs 480 euros. or how about an ivory tusk from an extinct mammoth? the specialty products for sale make the markets popular with international customers. >> a lot of things are handmade and not chinese. >> we have one in manchester. i wanted to see what the difference was. much better. >> christmas markets are a big draw for tourists and locals alike. this year's offerings are sure to delight a variety of pallets and budgets. and if there was any doubt, winter has most definitely arrived in germany. >> oh, yes, it has appeared the first bill falls in the c
at monticello. but it was in paris in the 1780s while jefferson, by then a widower, was u.s. minister to france. he supposedly began a nearly 40-year sexual liaison with sally who was there with him. by law she was free in france. before agreeing to return to virginia to slavery, she set conditions. >> according to her descendents, she said, i will go back with you if any children we have are allowed to be freed at 21. jefferson must have been totally flummaxed by this strong-willed i think quite courageous woman. >> reporter: in september 1802, a richmond virginia newspaper outed jefferson saying, by this wench, sally, our president has had several children. after that, the jefferson-hemmings story was whispered from one generation to the next for nearly 200 years by descendents of sally hemmings. many of whom passed for white. >> it's been an interesting journey for me because it started out when i was a kid, me standing up in class and saying thomas jefferson is my great great great great great great grandfather and being so happy and proud to brag about it when you're studying the president
of the jews who lived in the arab and muslim countries reside in israel mostly or in some cases france. the other side of the story is the christian communities that did until very recently. to talk about the iraqi christian community. it was about 1 million during 2003 and now it is that 40,000. they have suffered grievous amounts. last christmas with the catholic church in baghdad? "this is it" is a grim subjects but say something about how you approach this in the book. you have done a lot of research of the situation of christians and other countries. but this dovetails that you may not have happened upon. >> guest: right. first of all, i came across a subject when i was at a conference when i was at hudson. i had a blank spot on my calendar and wandered into a workshop. i heard stories of people who have fled the arab countries. it turned into an emotional scene. after the speakers of the panel q&a were people we've been talking about leaving their parents parents, homes, grandparents behind. i had no idea what they were talking about. before israel i read history books and there
. >> odds on whalt baby's name will be, top name for a girl, frances. top name for a boy, john. >> really? >> that's exciting. exciting names there. >> do you know what happens if it's twins? the first one that comes out is the heir, the second one that comes out is the spare unless the first one that comes out is a girl and the second one that comes out is a boy. the british have refused to change the rule that gives males precedence. >> they're working on that rule. >> they're working on it, but -- >> it may change. >> i don't think the queen is going to let them move that fast. >> they could grandfather it in. >> grandbaby it in. >>> a red line on syria. stern warning for president assad about using chemical weapons on his own people. >>> pictures surface of this, george zimmerman bloodied in the nose and mouth the night that trayvon martin was shot dead. [ male announcer ] it started long ago. it's called passion. and it's not letting up anytime soon. at unitedhealthcare insurance company, we understand that commitment. so does aarp, serving americans 50 and over for generations. so i
by the hurricane. donald trump is not a supporter of pesident obama but why anawonter to france. mr. trump here to explain shortly. ♪ ♪ why is it that the most impressive technology often comes with a set of equally impressive instructions ? shouldn't something that's truly advanced, not need much explanation at all ? with the nokia lumia 822 on verizon, there's not much to learn because it's powered by windows... to let you do more than you ever imagined on your smartphone. exclusively with data sense-- a feature that makes the most of your plan. only on verizon. till you finish your vegetables. [ clock ticking ] [ male announcer ] there's a better way... v8 v-fusion. vegetable nutrition they need, fruit taste they love. could've had a v8. or...try kids boxes! hurry in and try five succulent entrees, like ourender snow crab paired with savory garlic shrimp. just $12.99. come into red lobster and sea food differently. and introducing 7 lunch choices for just $7.99. >> gretchen: 52 minutes after the top of the hour. who ever said there is no such thing with a free lunch dined with uncle sam.
it on the revenue side. otherwise we're going to be looking at tax rates that would make france's new socialist government blush. you can't get there from here. >> i'll tell you something, jeb, i'm a stock guy. just like you, you don't want to talk about taxes. let's forget about this whole tax side. i want three ways to cut spending by $500 billion right now. how about we take social security up to 68. how about we slash medicare benefits? and why don't we cut the -- the defense budget? why do we need people in europe? why do we need them in japan? what are we doing in decree california? i want some answers to this. >> well, go to the web and look for the republican budget. that was written by the chairman of our budget committee paul ryan. you will see these savings -- >> 30-year, 40-year plan. i want to know what we can do -- >> well -- number one, defense has already been cut. we can debate how much it should be cut further but it has already been cut. i mean that's just a fact. >> but we added -- >> -- defense on the republican side. you have that global war turf. -- good idea. >> say agai
that slavery was less expensive than these new forms? brazil, u.s., britain, france, spain. >> a very interesting question. i think my first response would be to say i'm not sure so much that all forms of slavery disappeared as so much evolved in transition. obviously, there were laws passed that made a certain thing illegal. from a paper law stand point certain things disappeared. but the case of bonded labor it showed that things did not disappear but adapt to a different set of laws and climate. then evolved around those hurdles to continue to effect the same kind of mode of exi ployation. as to whether f there was a point in the past where producers were faced with a scenario where one set of nonslave-like labor bake more economic efficient there are certainly few instances. i think the historians here would probably have those more in their head than i do. particularly in case where is laws with penalties were perceived to be enforced. then the perception is that form of exploitation is no longer beneficial. we either have to evade it and try to do something similar or adopt for
, there is talk among some countries-- the u.s., britain, and france-- about the possibility of increased sanctions. it's an open question as to whether that will happen. do you think anything can dissuade north korea, one of the most sanctioned countries in the world, from continuing down this path realistically? >> i think it's the wrong path. any kind of sanction will not work. if, in fact, economic sanction especially were to force north korea to give in, north korea would have given in many times over. so so economic sanctions will not bring the desired consequence. so the -- we're talking about sanctions. what other sanctions are there? we have exhausted all sanctions. but north korea is not -- this time around no one is talking about possible demise collapse of the system. and when the grandfather died and the father died and all talks about it, about the possibility of the arab rising and then system collapse. but that is not going to happen. >> warner: professor park, thank you so much and david wright. thanks. >> thank you. >> woodruff: online you can see photographs of the cele
. there are some people who think there should be a ban like in france. there are others that think you can do this in the regulatory margins. let's talk about that when we come back. in keeping the denture clean. dentures are very different to real teeth. they're about 10 times softer and may have surface pores where bacteria can multiply. polident is designed to clean dentures daily. its unique micro-clean formula kills 99.9% of odor causing bacteria and helps dissolve stains, cleaning in a better way than brushing with toothpaste. that's why i recommend using polident. [ male announcer ] polident. cleaner, fresher, brighter every day. but they haven't experienced extra strength bayer advanced aspirin. in fact, in a recent survey, 95% of people who tried it agreed that it relieved their headache fast. visit fastreliefchallenge.com today for a special trial offer. who have used androgel 1%, there's big news. presenting androgel 1.62%. both are used to treat men with low testosterone. androgel 1.62% is from the makers of the number one prescribed testosterone replacement therapy. it raises you
. what was going to disagreements. the disagreements that canada, france and mexico and many other countries. but there's a mechanism we can all go to for a mutual refereeing of those issues are the wto is one way we can do that and the president has insisted that we do that. [inaudible] [inaudible] >> i'm sorry, i didn't have a chance to read the article. so i'm not familiar with everything else has mentioned the article. it's a question two minutes before the election there was this big tough on china team. >> in terms of the military, and that was announced almost a year before that. but what set off the discussion at the pit it was the announcement of joint exercises with australia and rotating about 2000 marines to australia. i don't think cheney should be fearful of 2000 marines in australia, but a lot of the dvd in terms of military collaboration with countries in the asia-pacific region involve responding to disasters at giving people the technical ability to respond to natural disasters and disaster relief. our engagement with other countries throughout the asia-pacific re
. the message about her concerns begin not just with the united states, but with france and other permanent members of the security hole who have worked together on many issues. but we did speak with the foreign minister plus some of the colleagues. evenhandedly deny this situation with the m23. it has not taken the steps of publicly denouncing on a bilateral basis to m23. we have raised this, and it is important that we continue to monitor this as others in the international community do on a very close basis. >> with respect to your second question about the international support or at least bilateral support to the rwandan government, i start with what i said to
gross domestic product on healthcare. the next highest was france and germany. united king come 9.6. and germany and france on many measures are getting better healthcare out comes than we are. and we know if you fast forward to 2012 we're not spending that, we're over 18%. 1 in every 6 dollars in this economy is going to healthcare. and however much one saves on healthcare, 40% of that flows through to the federal government because the federal government is paying 40% of healthcare in this country, actually something more than that. there is lots of room to save money in this healthcare system and there by save money in medicare and medicaid. we're talking about a very small percentage about what we intend to spend over the next ten years in the savings that are being discussed. the same is true on discretionary savings. the president called for $200 billion. discretionary savings on top of the billion that has been done. but if we put it in perspective we're going to spend in the domestic accounts in the next ten years $11.6 trillion. so a $200 billion savings is 1.7% of what w
contributing countries. european union, france, others have already begun to really engage with the malian forces, so it isn't as if there is an abstinence of support for them in the intervening period. >> what lessons have we learned, if i might, ms. dory and mr. gast, i think the mission just celebrated the 50th anniversary. we were actively engaged in the training a good thing as a part of the very probably democracy support and in trying to create and sustain a cultural democracy what lessons are there that we might learn going forward about political failures and more on domestic issues in the work rather abrupt requirement that we break off relations and support here has created a great difficulty with regional consequences. what lessons would you suggest we learn? the best of times mali is a country in crisis. it is a country that ranks of the model of a dozen. the assistant secretary carson mentioned 90% of the population is in the south and that population is also in the need of services. the government hasn't included both in the delivery of services as well as the governments of
of the south of france with the stories about meeting dave brubeck. >> mr. cosby, you spent some time with him. what was he like really as a person? >> in the 1950s the music was supposed to be the music of the cool, the cool guys, you know? psychology and smool smooth. that's what he was. he brought it with it and others who know music technically like marselles. hopefully you can get him on to explain to you those -- i mean, dave was really a different kind of player. rhythmically as he was thinking with the cords. he was cool. that's whaefs. cool. >> he broke racial barriers. you talked about that a little bit. what was behind that? what was behind his thinking that he felt. >> as i have said, racism is a waste of time, and people who try to push, it keep it out front because of whae their idiocy happens to be, there are people like dave and others, et cetera, et cetera, louie armstrong, they all move that in playing these places, that they were given an opportunity to say, month, it's not going to be that way, and i must tell you, another person who is not a musician, but was very, very im
in addition to support other contributing countries. european union, france, others have all already begun to reengage with maliian armed forces. it's not as if there is absent support for them in the intervening period. >> what lessons have i learned if i might, both ms. dory and mr. gast. we were actively engaged, the usaid mission celebrated a 50th anniversary, we were very involved in trying to sustain a culture democracy. whatlesssons are there that we might learn going forward about political failures, ignored domestic issues, our rather abrupt requirement that we break off relations and support here has created a great difficulty with regional consequences. what lessons would you suggest we learn from that? >> thank you, senator. excellent question. i would say in the best of times, mali is in a -- is a country in crisis. when one looks at a human development index, they rank in the bottom dozen. that's -- as assistant secretary carson mentioned, 90% of the population is in the south and that population is also in need of services. and so it is unfortunate that the government hasn't
person, former university professor with a ph.d. in engineering from france . that also, 12 different specialized committees, relief, local administration, committee on financial committee on finance. about every single penny is accounted for. the committee, and they're working on a number of projects to stabilize the city and help the transition into a free syria. of love to talk about those projects of those councils on working on. >> can you say just a few words about the relationship between this council, the civilian counsel and the military, what we typically referred to as the free syrian army? >> about 80 percent of those coalesced under the military council. and they were headed up by the secretary general, colonel by the name of. [indiscernible] so all of those groups so far those groups to maintain their separate identity. they do maintain their separate names, but they're all fighting in the banner of this council. they all differ to the disciplined, professional, colonel. and i would say that the relationship between the civilian council and the military council is charac
and france come we traveled there as the t-3, three permanent members of the security council who have worked together on many issues. but we did speak with the foreign minister, plus some of her colleagues. again, we raised the issue of the need to and outside support. as in previous discussions, the rwandan government strongly, vehemently denies that it is providing any assistance to the m23, and it has not taken the steps of publicly denouncing on a bilateral basis the m23. so we have raised this, and it's important that we continue to monitor this as others in the international community do on a very, very close basis. with respect to your second question about international support, or at least our bilateral support to the rwandan government, i start with what i said to congressman marino earlier, is that they utilize their international assistance, not only from us in particular, but others very, very effectively and to use it with great integrity. people get it. we are not providing any cash or check transfers. it all goes through international organization and donor groups that work w
to do that? do we need to go to coalition partners britain and france? where is the potential for mission creep and escalation? which is exactly what we house -- what we saw happen in somalia and it dovetailed off over mogadishu. and i do not think you mentioned to the warlords, did you? gregg's warlords are not here. of taking care of these problems. >> that is foreign internal defense. >> right now we have three personnel who are part of the monusco mission. when we had the training effort underway for the 391st, it was about 60 folks. there are now out. it is a limited footprint. about 17,000 u.n. troops in the congo. >> all of these different non state, non uniform belligerents coming together against our efforts, is there a potential there? >> no. i would like to underscore what has been said. we're not talking about american soldiers on the ground, engaged against rebel groups in the drc. that is not something that is in our game plan or in our thinking. what we need to focus on -- >> train and enable? >> to train and unable, build capacity. >> build capacity, an able an
. >> host: >> guest: beenu mahmood was one of a group of pakistani france he had in new york. they shared with him sort of an international perspective which he lived in indonesia and his brother was there, he was searching for himself and comfortable with these guys. when he got in new york, they move their, he was the various to guy -- very astute guy. obama moved to new york to find his blackness but it didn't happen. president obama when i interviewed him in the oval office acknowledged he made no lasting african-american friends in his four years in new york. he was starting to make that transition in his search for home. that change was starting to happen and beenu mahmood perceptively saw that going on and took him to chicago. >> host: why did the president stay in new york after graduating from columbia? >> guest: wanted to get into community organizing. he actually applied for a job in chicago. he didn't get anything. the best he could do was stay in new york if. he didn't want to go back to honolulu. didn't have any place else so he stayed there and as he put it he tried to make
enlisted in the u.s. army's 44 regimental a team. he saw combat in italy and southern france and was badly wounded during an engagement for which he was awarded the distinguished service cross which was later upgraded to the medal of honor, the highest award for military valor. with financial assistance from the g.i. bill, inouye graduated from the university of hawaii and the george washington university law school. when hawaii became a state on august 21st, 1959, daniel inouye ran for the united states house of representatives as the new state's first congressman. leaders elected to the united states senate in 1962, he is currently serving his eighth term in the united states senate. an hour earlier interviews in a series, other people we've spoken to have talked about the first time they were sworn in as a member of congress. and in 1959 you became the first member from hawaii. what was that like when you were first on the floor of the house of representatives? >> well, i've spent some time in washington before this. as you know, i went to law school, but i have never been on the floor
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)